Section 06 – Multiple Phases


Imposing an Imposition – Filling the Sheet

Since IDImposer takes an input InDesign document ‘A’ and creates an output InDesign document ‘B’, a natural question is: “What happens if we do it again?” What if we take document ‘B’ and use it as input to IDImposer to create a new document, ‘C’?  Is that useful?

Well, it turns out that it is useful indeed, especially if you are using larger sheets of paper, but have smaller original pages.

To take a simple example, suppose we want to produce a 12-page booklet, with 5×7-inch pages. On a printer or small printing press, we might do a 2-up saddle stitch imposition, onto standard Letter size paper of 11×8.5-inch sheets. But if we have a larger printer or printing press, one that uses 11×17-inch or 12×18-inch sheets, we don’t want to waste half of our paper. By adding a 1-Column 2-Row Replication (Step-and-Repeat) Phase to our IDImposer run, we can fill the larger sheets (and make half of the printing impressions.)

You create a 2nd phase by clicking the ‘Add Phase’ button. Then choose the Imposition Type, etc, for your new phase.

Example 2

In Example 2, the input to the first Phase will be the user’s starting “Reader Spread” Document (“Document A”), and we will specify the output of Phase 1 to be a Perfect Bound “Document B” … a “2-Up” (2-column, 1-row per Front of Sheet) Document.

But since Document B is just a normal InDesign Document (except for having mostly-non-editable pages and optional crop marks), we can define a Phase 2 that puts all of the Backs-of-Sheets of Document B on the same side of the sheet as the Fronts … creating a “Work and Turn” (“1-sided”) new “Document C.” Document C is a 4-Up (4-column, 1-row-per-Sheet) Document.

But Document C is just a normal InDesign Document (except for having mostly-frozen pages and optional crop marks), so we can define a Phase 3 that makes better use of the actual media by replicating the single row of Document C into an 8-Up (4-column, 2-row-per-sheet) “Document D.”

Thus the original pages from Document A are now (re-)arranged into Document D, in a layout that looks like this:

4 1   2 3
4 1   2 3

8 5   6 7
8 5   6 7

12 9  10 11
12 9  10 11